Invalid Wills

A Will is an official legal document and therefore particular  rules must be followed to ensure that it is valid.

Often, it is not apparent that a will is invalid until the person whose estate it relates to dies, particular where a Will has been made at home, and without legal advice.

A Will (or parts of it) may be considered invalid if the person making it:

  • Was not of sound mind, memory or understanding
  • Was put under undue pressure to leave assets to specific individuals; or
  • Did not sign or have it witnessed properly.

An invalid Will may be rectified by courts. However, if a family member challenges the rectification, this can lead to a lengthy and costly dispute.

Our Inheritance and Estates Dispute team will explain the processes involved  in clear, unambiguous terms and  guide you towards resolution.

We have extensive experience in challenging the validity of a Will. When instructed, our first step is to consider why the Will may be invalid before advising you on the best way to proceed.

The Inheritance & Estate Disputes Team

Meet our specialist lawyers who can advise you on all aspects of contentious probate.

an image of Anthony Higham, a Butcher & Barlow LLP employee

Anthony Higham

Bury - Head Office

an image of Alex Sandland, a Butcher & Barlow LLP employee

Alex Sandland

Northwich - Gadbrook Park

an image of Greg Porter, a Butcher & Barlow LLP employee

Greg Porter

Northwich

an image of James Holton, a Butcher & Barlow LLP employee

James Holton

Northwich - Gadbrook Park

an image of Samuel Dale, a Butcher & Barlow LLP employee

Samuel Dale

Sandbach

an image of Catherine Gregson, a Butcher & Barlow LLP employee

Catherine Gregson

Northwich - Gadbrook Park

an image of Tom Sedley, a Butcher & Barlow LLP employee

Thomas Sedley

Bury - Head Office

Cameron Shaw

Cameron Shaw

Northwich - Gadbrook Park